Courses

UNDERGRAD HISTORY AND CRITICISM | UNDERGRAD STUDIO ART | GRAD HISTORY AND CRITICISM | GRAD STUDIO ART |

SBU ART FALL 2014 COURSE SCHEDULE:

 

UNDERGRADUATE ART HISTORY AND CRITICISM COURSES

ARH 105 Art, Art History and the Creative Process

An introduction to the creative process in art making and conceptual tools for understanding the visual arts. Students learn various methods of the creative process through demonstrations and hands-on projects in the studio, interwoven with lectures and discussions on related themes in art history and criticism. This course is offered as both ARH 105 and ARS 105.

DEC: D
SBC: ARTS
3 credits

ARH 201 Arts of Africa

An introduction to the arts of sub-Saharan Africa with an emphasis on the history of sculptural traditions, especially figurative sculpture and masquerade. These arts are examined within their social and cultural contexts in the service of politics, leadership and social integration, as objects of ritual and religious practice, and as evidence of aesthetic choices and achievements.

DEC: D
SBC: ARTS
3 credits

ARH 203 Arts of Asia

A general course on Far Eastern art covering India, China, and Japan from its beginnings to the present. Emphasis is on the major arts of painting and sculpture, with some reference to architecture.

Prerequisite: ARH 101 or 102 or 202 or 204
DEC: J
SBC: ARTS, GLO
3 credits

ARH 204 Arts in the Age of Exploration

An introduction to the history of art with a focus on the transition from Medieval times through the Renaissance and Baroque in Europe. Works of art are studied both as individual monuments with intrinsic aesthetic appeal and as expressions of the needs, ideals, and aspirations of the particular society within which they were created. Artists, patrons and artistic movements are understood within the context of the expanding horizons of the age of exploration and cross-cultural encounters. Not for credit in addition to ARH 102.

DEC: D
SBC: ARTS
3 credits

ARH 205 Introduction to Architecture

An introduction to the discipline of architecture through various interpretations of its technological and cultural functions. Focusing on the history of architecture’s engagement with engineering, anthropology, sociology, and politics, this course explores changing conceptions of the nature and the task of architecture.

DEC: G
SBC: ARTS
3 credits

ARH 206 Modern Art

An introduction to the history of modern art, beginning with French Rococo and concluding with themes and concerns of a globally interconnected art world. Particular attention will be given to the rise of Modernism in Europe, the role of artists and artistic movements in social and political change, and the relationship of contemporary artistic practice to technology, social media and visual culture.

DEC: D
SBC: ARTS
3 credits

ARH 207 Technologies of Representation

An introduction to the dynamic relationship between technology and the ways we see and represent the world, and the historical, cultural, and theoretical issues raised by technologies of representation, including print; photography; film; sound and computational media. This course is offered as ARH 207 and DIA 207.

DEC: D
SBC: ARTS, TECH
3 credits

ARH 208 History of Photography

A historical survey of the technical, theoretical, and aesthetic development of black-and-white and color still photography and its close interrelationship with the evolution of modern art.

DEC: G
SBC: ARTS
3 credits

ARH 209 Arts of the United States

An introduction to the history of painting, sculpture, and architecture in the United States from the late colonial period to World War II. Particular emphasis will be given to understanding art’s changing forms and meanings and its relationship to crucial themes and developments in American history: the impact of national expansion, for example, and of immigration, urbanization, and modernization more generally. The course will also focus on the varied images of American society created by artists of diverse class, racial, and ethnic backgrounds.

DEC: K
SBC: ARTS, USA
3 credits

ARH 299 Gallery Management Workshop

Development of practical skills in the business and managerial problems of an art gallery. Assigned readings focus on arts administration, arts conservation, and connoisseurship. May be repeated twice.

Prerequisite: ARH 101 or 102 or 202 or 204

1 credit

ARH 300 Greek Art and Architecture

The study of ancient Greek art and architecture from the earliest beginnings in the geometric period through the archaic, classical, and Hellenistic periods.

Prerequisite: ARH 101 or ARH 202
DEC: I
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 301 Roman Art and Architecture

The study of ancient Roman art and architecture from the Republic through the Constantinian period in Italy and the greater Roman world.

Prerequisite: ARH 101 or ARH 202
DEC: I
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 302 Ancient Egyptian Art

Survey of art and architecture of ancient Egypt from the development of the first monumental art and architecture (c. 3000 B.C.) through the Early Christian era (c. 300 A.D.) focusing on culturally specific concepts of representation and aesthetics and the status and purposes of ancient Egyptian arts. The role of patronage, the uses of art and architecture in cult, in temples, and in tombs, and the relationship of art and politics are considered, along with the question of the place of Egyptian art within the development of world art and the concept of Egypt as the African origins of Western civilization.

Prerequisite: ARH 101 or ARH 202
DEC: J
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 305 Art and Culture of the Middle Ages

A broad examination of the art and architecture of the Middle Ages in the context of medieval history and culture. Topics include relationships to the imperial tradition, monasticism, and feudalism; the interaction and legacy of Roman, Celtic, and Germanic arts; the rise of urban culture and the creative competition between cities.

Prerequisite: ARH 101 or ARH 202
DEC: I
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 306 The Early Renaissance in Italy

Art in Italy in from the late 13th through the 15th centuries, with special emphasis on Florence and Siena, and such major figures as Masaccio, Donatello, Piero della Francesca, and Botticelli. This course offered as both ARH 306 and HUI 306.

Prerequisite: ARH 101 or ARH 204
DEC: I
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 307 The Age of Michelangelo in Central Italy

An exploration of the works of Michelangelo, Da Vinci and other major masters, including Raphael, Bramante and Pontormo, who inspired, were influenced by or rejected the work and ideals of Michelangelo.This course is offered as both ARH 307 and HUI 307.

Prerequisite: ARH 101 or ARH 204
DEC: I
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 308 Writing About Art

An advanced topics course with a focus on research, analytical skills and writing about art. Students analyze essays by different artists, scholars, and critics about a central topic before selecting and developing their own related topic to research. The final project is a research paper that begins with a thesis statement and outline, includes several drafts, oral presentations, peer review and a final product. Seminar format with visual lectures, discussions, and field trips to museums and galleries.

Prerequisite: enrollment in the ARH major/minor and permission of instructor
SBC: WRTD
3 credits

ARH 310 Splendors of Renaissance Art in Venice

The special qualities of Venetian art, which blends Byzantine, Islamic, and Western traditions, are explored through the works of such major figures as Giovanni Bellini, Giorgione, Titian, Veronese, and Palladio. Course offered as both ARH 310 and HUI 310.

Prerequisite: ARH 101 and ARH 102; or ARH 204
Advisory prerequisite: ARH 307
DEC: I
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 314 Northern Baroque Art and Architecture, 1600-1700

A study structured around the comparison of the art and architecture of urban and court cultures in 17th century Flanders, Netherlands, France, and England. Topics include royal and court portraiture (Rubens, Van Dyck, Le Brun), individual and civic portraiture of the Dutch middle classes (Rembrandt, Hals), genre painting and the marketing of ‘low life’ imagery (Steen, Brouwer), the production of the domestic sphere in Dutch everyday life scenes (Vermeer, Metsu, Ter Borch), the rise of landscape (Poussin, Lorrain, Hobberma), as well as urban and court spectacle in Antwerp, London, and Versailles.

Prerequisite: ARH 102 or ARH 204
DEC: I
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 315 Art and Architecture of Spain and Colonial Latin America 1500-1700

This course surveys painting, sculpture, and architecture in Spain and colonial Latin America during the reign of the Habsburg dynasty. We will discuss the arrival of the Renaissance in Spain and the adoption of classical architecture and renaissance modes of painting by Charles V and Philip II, the painted distortions of El Greco, the Spanish tradition of hyper-realistic wooden sculpture, the paintings of Ribera, Zurbaran, Murillo, and Velazquez’s work for Philip IV. We will also discuss mission architecture and decoration in early colonial Latin America and the hybrid form created by the fusion of Spanish and Amerindian culture, as well as manuscript and secular painting, finishing up our survey with a discussion of urban cathedrals and palaces in Mexico and Peru.

Prerequisite: ARH 102 or ARH 204
DEC: G
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 316 Baroque Art in Italy and Spain, 1600-1700

Examines the visual culture of Counter-Reformation Italy, focusing in depth primarily on the painting, sculpture, and architecture of seventeenth century Rome. We will begin with the challenge to mannerism provided by the Carracci family academy in Bologna, and then discuss Annibale Carracci’s subsequent move to Rome and his work for the Farnese family, the emergence of Caravaggio and the Roman market for genre scenes, public and private religious imagery, violence and eroticism in religious art in Naples, as well as architectural and decorative projects by the Papacy and the religious orders. Artists, architects, and sculptors discussed include such figures as Caravaggio, Carracci, Bernini, Borromini, Guido Reni, Artemisia Gentileschi, Salvator Rosa, Pietro da Cortona and Andrea Sacchi. The broad range of a general survey will be balanced with close critical readings of selected objects and artists.

Prerequisite: ARH 102 or ARH 204
DEC: I
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 317 Islamic Art

Art and architecture in the Islamic world from ca. 600 A.D. to the present, introducing the varied traditions of the arts of the Islamic world, from Spain and Morocco to the Indian subcontinent. Consideration of both religious and secular art and architecture in their historical and cultural contexts with emphasis on the development of Islamic forms of visual representation.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; one ARH course
DEC: J
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 318 History of Chinese Painting

A study of Chinese painting from its beginnings to the present, in relation to art theories written by the artists themselves and their contemporaries.

Prerequisite: ARH 101 or ARH 102 or ARH 204
Advisory Prerequisite: CNS/SSI 249 or 250 or courses in Chinese philosophy or history
DEC: J
SBC: GLO, HFA+
3 credits

ARH 319 Arts of China

A survey of Chinese art from the Neolithic period to modern-day China. Visual media such as bronze, jade, sculpture, ink painting and pottery as well as their cultural influence on philosophy, literature, religion and politics will be explored. The course will also examine the influence of India and Central Asian on Chinese art and, in turn, China’s influence on Korean and Japanese art.

Prerequisite: One DEC D course and U3 or U4 standing
DEC: J
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 320 Art in the Age of Enlightenment

A survey of European art from about 1690 to 1790. Although lectures usually focus on a single artist at a time, the course as a whole stresses artistic attitudes as well as a progression of styles. An effort is made to study art in historical and cultural context, especially in the light of the new philosophies of rationalism, empiricism and individualism that developed and led to both industrial and political revolutions. The three schools covered are the Venetian, English, and French, from the late Baroque and the Rococo styles to the rise of landscape and early Romantic art. Major artists treated are Tiepolo, Canaletto, Watteau, Chardin, Boucher, Fragonard, Hogarth, Gainsborough, Greuze and David.

Prerequisite: ARH 102 or ARH 204
DEC: I
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 322 American Art Since 1947

A survey of painting and sculpture in New York, including abstract expressionism, hard edge painting, pop art, minimal art, earthworks, protest art, and postmodernism.

Prerequisite: ARH 102 or ARH 206
Advisory Prerequisite: ARH 342
DEC: G
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 324 Architecture and Design of the 19th and 20th Centuries

A survey of architecture and design from the end of the 18th century to the present. Subjects covered include the crystallization and evolution of Romantic classicism and Romantic naturalism, historicism, the arts and crafts movement, art nouveau, machine aesthetics, the beaux arts tradition, functionalism, the international style, art deco, and postmodernism.

Prerequisite: ARH 102 or ARH 204
DEC: G
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 325 Ancient Mesopotamian Art

Survey of the art and architecture of ancient Mesopotamia from the establishment of the first cities and the development of the first monumental architecture (c. 3300 B.C.) through the Hellenistic conquest. Focus on concepts of representation and aesthetics and their uses in politics, private rituals, and state cults.

Prerequisite: ARH 101 or ARH 202
DEC: J
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 326 Arts of Ancient Mesoamerica

A survey of the artistic and cultural achievements of the major civilizations of Central America prior to the European conquest. Emphasis is on architectural and sculptural art forms and the ritual, social, and political contexts within which they were created.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing
DEC: J
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 328 Arts of West Africa

A study of the arts of West Africa from ancient to contemporary civilizations. Emphasis is primarily on the history of sculptural traditions, especially figurative sculpture and masquerade. These arts are examined in their political, social, and cultural contexts, as objects of ritual and religious practices, and as evidence of aesthetic choices and achievements.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing
DEC: J
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 329 Arts of the African Diaspora

A study of the arts of the African Diaspora from the African continent to Brazil, Surinam, the Caribbean, and the United States. Emphasis is on the full range of art forms, including not only sculptural and performance traditions, but also textiles, basketry, and other crafts. Cultural continuities, spiritual belief, and significant changes in context, meaning, style, and technology are examined.This course is offered as both AFH 339 and ARH 329.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing
DEC: G
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 330 Public Art and Urban Design in New York City

Explores the history of public arts and urban built environments in New York City, from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day. The city itself will be a key resource, and the course will involve site visits to a number of key monuments, institutions, and other locales. The focus of study will include statues, memorials, plaques, parks, and street furniture, and the people, institutions, and events that produced them. Drawing on perspectives from art history, American Studies, and urban and social history, the course will consider the impact of such developments as war, immigration and urbanization, political reconfigurations and commercial expansion, ethnic, racial, and interpersonal conflict, tourism, and terrorism.

Prerequisite: ARH 101, ARH 102, ARH 209, or CCS 101
Advisory Prerequisite: ARH 331, ARH 332
DEC: G
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 333 Arts for the Public

The history of efforts to develop forms of artistic work that engage broad audiences of citizens and consumers. Examination of a range of enterprises spanning the century, including monuments, murals, animated cartoons, propaganda, and the Web. Drawing on perspectives from art history, social history, and cultural studies, the course considers developments throughout the 20th century in the United States such as urbanization, political and business expansion, class and racial conflict, war, and technological innovation, in relation to art work.

Prerequisite: ARH 102 or ARH 209 or CCS 101
DEC: K
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 334 Performance Art I: The European Avant-Garde

This course explores the history and theory of avant-garde performance from its inception in the early 20th century through Surrealism. Questions addressed focus on the choices made by artists, and the forces within the culture that encourage the forms they use. Course projects include a performance that reconstructs an event from one of the periods studied and a term paper. This course is offered as both ARH 334 and THR 334.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; one ARH, ARS, MUS, or THR course
DEC: G
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 336 The Computer and the Arts

An introduction to historical and theoretical issues in computational art. Following discussion of basic concepts in studying digital media, the course focuses on examining the history of computer technologies as they intersect with the arts and the theoretical, cultural and aesthetic ramifications of this intersection.

Prerequisite: ARH 207
DEC: H
SBC: STAS
3 credits

ARH 337 Northern Renaissance Art

Painting and graphic art in the Netherlands and Germany in the 15th and 16th centuries are studied with special emphasis on the major figures of this period, from van Eyck and van der Weyden to Durer, Holbein, and Bruegel.

Prerequisite: ARH 101 or ARH 102 or ARH 204
DEC: I
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 344 Performance Art II: World War II to the Present

This course explores the history and theory of performance art from World War II to the present, using an international perspective to identify different forms and practices from Happenings to Body Art and the introduction of new technologies. Questions addressed focus on the choices made by artists, and the forces within the culture that encourage the forms they use. Course projects include developing a site specific performance and a term paper. This course is offered as both ARH 344 and THR 344.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing; one ARH, ARS, MUS, or THR course
Advisory Prerequisites: ARH/THR 334
DEC: G
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 345 The Moving Image in 20th century Art

A survey of the use of cinematic technologies within modern and contemporary art practice, from the historical avant-guard to contemporary multiscreen video installation. Situates the history and theory of this work in relation to the evolution of modern art and media culture.

Prerequisites: ARH 102 or ARH 206 or ARH 208 or CCS 101
Advisory Prerequisites: ARH 342
DEC: G
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 346 Art and Politics in the Age of Revolution

A survey of European art from about 1790 to 1850, stressing artistic attitudes as well as a progression of styles. A special effort is made to view art in historical and cultural context. A principal theme is the development of the modern artistic ideology through ideals such as genius, originality, and the sublime, all of which emerge in the context of a series of political revolutions going from 1789 to 1848. Conflict between the aesthetic and the political, the personal and the public, the traditional and the modern will be explored. Major artists treated are: David, Goya, Fuessli, Blake, Runge, Friedrich, Constable, Ingres, Gericault, Delacroix, Turner, Courbet. Not for credit in addition to ARH 341.

Prerequisite: ARH 102 or ARH 206
Advisory Prerequisite: One or more 300-level ARH courses
DEC: I
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 347 Avant-Garde Art: Realism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism

An examination of the origins of the avant-garde in European painting and its revolutionary developments from Impressionism through Post Impressionism. The course explores the social, political, and cultural roots of the artists who overturned conservative traditions in favor of modern values and thus established the basis and direction for the art of our time. Conflicts between the aesthetic and the political, the personal and the public, the traditional and the modern will be explored. Social relationships, including those of class and gender, are also embedded in works claiming objective naturalism. Major artists treated are Manet, Degas, Monet, Renoir, Pissarro, Seurat, Van Gogh, Gauguin and Cezanne. Not for credit in addition to ARH 341.

Prerequisite: ARH 102 or ARH 206
Advisory Prerequisite: One or more 300-level ARH courses
DEC: I
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 348 Contemporary Art

A survey of art from 1980 to the present. Topics include Site-Specificity, Biennial Cultures, Art Markets, Video Art, Performance, Institutional Critique, Art and Technology, Appropriation, Collectivity and Globalization.

Prerequisite: ARH 206 or ARH 207
DEC: G
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 391 Topics in Global Art

Topics may include titles such as The Art of India or The Experience of Contemporary Art. May be repeated as the topic changes. Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic within humanities disciplines such as music, art, literature, religion, and philosophy. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods used in the humanities discipline(s) studied. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; one ARH course
DEC: G
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARH 400 Topics in Art History and Criticism

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: ARH 101 or 102; one other ARH course, varying with topic

3 credits

ARH 420 History and Methods of Art History

Seminar designed to engage students with the history and methods of art history. Through close readings of key texts and discussions, the course explores issues raised by aesthetics, iconography, formalism, the social history of art, as well as the impact of semiotics, feminism, psychoanalysis, and post-modernism on the discipline of art history.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; ARH 101 and 102
Advisory Prerequisite: One other ARH course
3 credits

ARH 475 Undergraduate Teaching Practicum I

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member’s regularly scheduled classes. The student is required to attend all the classes, do all the regularly assigned work, and meet with the faculty member at regularly scheduled times to discuss the intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course.

Prerequisites: Art history/criticism major; preferably U4 standing; sponsorship of an instructor; permission of department
SBC: EXP+
3 credits, S/U grading

ARH 476 Undergraduate Teaching Practicum II

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member’s regularly scheduled classes. The student is required to attend all the classes, do all the regularly assigned work, and meet with the faculty member at regularly scheduled times to discuss the intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course. In ARH 476, students assume greater responsibility in such areas as leading discussions and analyzing results of tests that have already been graded. Students may not serve as teaching assistants in the same course twice.

Prerequisites: ARH 475; permission of instructor and director of undergraduate studies
SBC: EXP+
3 credits, S/U grading

ARH 485 Projects in Art History and Criticism in New York City

Independent work, under the supervision of a faculty member, investigating work or works from a particular style or period in New York City.

Prerequisites: ARH 101 and 102; two other ARH courses; permission of sponsor and department

0 – 6 credits

ARH 487 Independent Reading and Research in Art

May be repeated up to a maximum of 12 credits.

Prerequisite: At least four courses in art; sponsorship of a faculty member; permission of department

0 – 6 credits

ARH 488 Internship

Participation in the work of galleries, museums, arts agencies, and art historical societies. Students are required to submit written progress reports and a final report of their experiences to the faculty coordinator and the department. May be repeated up to a limit of 12 credits, but no more than six credits may count toward the major in art history/criticism and no more than three credits may count toward the major in studio art.

Prerequisite: Fifteen credits in the Art Department, of which at least six shall be in art history/criticism; upper-division standing with preference given to U4 students; permission of instructor and department
SBC: EXP+
0 – 6 credits, S/U grading

ARH 490 Senior Seminar: Topics in Art History, Museum Studies, and Criticism

An advanced seminar for juniors and seniors that prepares students for continued study or work in the fields of art history, criticism, museum studies and other related areas. Topic will change each year depending on the topic chosen by the instructor.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; ARH 101 and 102; one additional ARH course

3 credits

ARH 495 Senior Honors Project in Art History and Criticism

A one-semester project for art history and criticism majors who are candidates for the degree with departmental honors.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and department

3 credits

 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDIO ART COURSES

ARS 105 Art, Art History and the Creative Process

An introduction to the creative process in art making and conceptual tools for understanding the visual arts. Students learn various methods of the creative process through demonstrations and hands-on projects in the studio, interwoven with lectures and discussions on related themes in art history and criticism. This course is offered as both ARH 105 and ARS 105.

DEC: D
SBC: ARTS
3 credits

ARS 154 Foundations of Drawing

Fundamentals of drawing using various drawing media and types of paper. Perspective, foreshortening, proportion, anatomy, and basic concepts of drawing are studied. The figure, still life, and landscape are explored as subject matter, and color theory is introduced.

DEC: D
SBC: ARTS
3 credits

ARS 205 Foundations: Idea and Form

An exploration of the basic building blocks of artistic practice and aesthetic analysis. Projects, readings, presentations, and discussions are used to examine the impact cultural, environmental and social context have on meaning and perception in art and visual culture. Projects are organized around themes such as line, plane, volume, color, composition, pattern, scale, narrative, performance, light and time. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/course fees for more information.

DEC: D
SBC: ARTS
3 credits

ARS 225 Introductory Digital Arts

A hands-on introduction to the use of computers in the fine arts. Students explore image creation/manipulation, digital publishing and moving image through lecture, lab and discussion. Emphasis is on the expressive potential of the technology. No prior computer experience is required. Study of the history and impact of digital media on the arts and contemporary culture contextualize practical assignments. This course serves as preparation for further study in electronic media. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Advisory Prerequisite: ARS 205

3 credits

ARS 230 Foundations of Two-Dimensional Design

Introduction to basic design principles and their application on the two-dimensional surface, with investigation into different functions and properties of the formal elements of line, value, texture, shape, space and their organizational use of basic relational elements (repetition, scale, rhythm). Abstract problems stress graphic and systematic approaches to visual problem solving. Primary media are pencil, charcoal, ink, tempera, and cut paper in black and white.

Prerequisite: ARS 154

3 credits

ARS 255 Introductory Painting

Introductory painting in oils or acrylics. The various media, tools, and techniques of painting and of preparing surfaces for painting are explored. Continues the work of ARS 154 in the traditional areas of landscape, still life, and figure, as well as in perspective, foreshortening, proportion, anatomy, and color theory. One or two field trips to New York City museums and galleries may be required.

Prerequisite: ARS 154

3 credits

ARS 256 Introductory Sculpture

An introduction to sculpture. Students will learn basic skills and concepts relevant to 3-D creation, using a variety of materials and techniques. Specific sequentially organized projects in armature building, modeling, casting, and wood construction to develop technical skills, in conjunction with lectures, group critiques and discussions.

Prerequisite: ARS 154 or ARS 205

3 credits

ARS 264 Ceramics

Investigation of ceramic ware and ceramic sculpture utilizing a wide variety of approaches in earthenware and stoneware clay bodies. The course offers a technical and conceptual foundation for clay construction, low- and high-fire glazing, and multiple finishing techniques using gas and electric firing processes. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Prerequisite: ARS 154

3 credits

ARS 274 Beginning Printmaking

An introduction to printmaking. Demonstrations and lectures treat printmaking techniques and print shop procedures. Students are introduced to intaglio (etching, drypoint, engraving), relief (wood block, line block) monoprinting, and if time permits, lithography. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Prerequisite: ARS 154

3 credits

ARS 281 Introductory Photography

An introduction to the creative techniques and visual grammar of contemporary photographic image production. This course presents core camera operations, lens-based techniques, and software applications used in digital image processing and output. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information. Estimated cost of supplies is $450, in addition to the course fee.

DEC: D
SBC: ARTS
3 credits

ARS 299 Studio Management Workshop

Development of practical skills needed to manage and maintain a studio lab or shop in the art department. Students work under the supervision of a faculty member in an area of interest, such as photography, printmaking, electronic media, or sculpture. May be repeated twice.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

1 credit, S/U grading

ARS 318 Movie Making: Shoot, Edit, Score

An investigation of the relationship between music and film and video. Students script, shoot, edit, and create short videos with soundtracks, exploring different aspects of visuals and music. All editing is done digitally. Works may be made for screen, installation, or performance. Also examines historical and contemporary artistic exploration with such media. Formerly offered as ARS/THR 318. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Prerequisite: ARS/MUS/THR/CDT 208 or ARS 225 or CCS 101

3 credits

ARS 324 Intermediate Digital Art: Design

This course focuses on the aesthetic, social, political, and ethical issues at stake in the production of design. The course extends beyond two-dimensional graphic design to include critical approaches to the practice and production of architecture, urbanism, environmental design, social life, and fine art.

Prerequisite: ARS/MUS/THR/CDT 208 or ARS 225

3 credits

ARS 325 Digital Arts: Print

An introduction to the practice and theory of constructed digital art and design through lecture, labs, readings and art production. Students use contemporary compositing, page layout and design techniques to create image centered works of art, including digital prints, artist’s books, data based visualization, and installations. Hybrid combinations of digital and analog image making techniques are also explored. Study of the history and impact of digital print media on the arts and contemporary culture contextualize practical assignments. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Prerequisite: ARS/MUS/THR/CDT 208 or ARS 225 or ARS 281

3 credits

ARS 326 Video Art: Narrative Forms

An exploration of the practice, theory, and history of narrative video art and independent cinema through lecture, production and critique. Students script, plan, shoot and edit short narrative video works for screen and projection. Emphasis is on story development, technical proficiency, creative execution and critical thinking. Video production and editing is done digitally. Video production is supported by the study of historical and contemporary examples of narrative-based video art. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Prerequisite: ARS/MUS/THR/CDT 208 or ARS 225 or ARS 281

3 credits

ARS 327 Digital Arts: Web Design and Culture

An exploration of the practice and history of art on the Internet through lecture, project production, discussion and critique. Students create content for the web and mobile platforms while examining historical, and theoretical issues related to art and design on the Internet. Images, text, sound, and code are used to create web-based artworks and informational sites in response to course content. Emphasis is on creative use of current web technologies and software, as well as an examination of the cultural implications of the web. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Prerequisite: ARS/MUS/THR/CDT 208 or ARS 225
DEC: H
SBC: STAS
3 credits

ARS 328 Digital Arts: Animation

An investigation of the practice, theory, and history of animation within art and independent media through labs, lecture, readings, and project critiques. Animation production will cover computer-based stop-motion as well as some 2D and 3D computer animation. Emphasis is on creative content, experimentation and critical thinking. Students work with computer based 2D and 3D animation tools to create several short assignments and one significant project using one or more techniques.

Prerequisite: ARS/MUS/THR/CDT 208 or ARS 225
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARS 329 Video Art: Experimental Forms

An exploration of video as a fine art medium. Video is a pliable medium that can be integrated into objects, installations and performances; exhibited as single or multi-channel projects and harnessed for its light and time bending capacities. Students explore the potential of video as fine art material through production, lecture, discussion and critique, including an overview of important contemporary and historical video art projects, and related readings, support art production. Emphasis is on the exploration of experimental video methods and video centered artworks, rather than conventional narrative forms. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Prerequisite: ARS/MUS/THR/CDT 208 or ARS 225 or ARS 281
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARS 350 Life Drawing and Painting

Drawing and painting of the human figure. May be repeated once. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Prerequisite: ARS 255

3 credits

ARS 351 Painting II: Theory and Practice

Painting and drawing studio; practice and theory stressing exploration of media and crafts, historical styles, and individual development.

Prerequisite: ARH 102 and ARS 255

3 credits

ARS 352 Painting III: Theory and Practice

A continuation of ARS 351, stressing the individual development of the student as a maturing artist through critiques of the student’s work and discussion of contemporary and historical issues in art. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Prerequisite: ARS 351

3 credits

ARS 359 Theory and Practice of Conceptual Drawing

The further study of different processes and methods of generating drawings, encouraging individual expression. Slide presentations, assigned readings, and gallery visits are part of the student’s experience. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Prerequisite: ARH 102 and ARS 255

3 credits

ARS 364 Advanced Theory and Practice of Ceramics

An advanced course in ceramics stressing sophisticated sculptural forms and techniques in earthenware, stoneware, porcelain, and raku clay bodies. Class work is based on individual projects stressing expression of ideas and image making. Additional techniques of mold making, slip casting, and raku firing enlarge the repertoire of construction and surface finishes. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Prerequisites: ARS 264 and ARH 102

3 credits

ARS 365 Theories and Practice of Sculpture: Welding, Construction, and Intermedia

A range of techniques, materials and ways to approach sculpture will be explored. The class will consist of technical demonstrations in wood constructions, plasma cutting, welding, forming, forging in metal, and related concepts and techniques in intermedia. Through lectures, critiques and discussions, the course will also address the various stages of planning, from conceptualizing the idea, gathering materials, to physical and material considerations.

Prerequisites: ARS 256

3 credits

ARS 366 Theory and Practice of Sculpture: Modeling, Casting, and Carving

A historical and philosophical survey of sculpture in expanded fields. Exploration focusing on site as a major component of artwork in both content and form, emphasizing multidimensional work in relation to context, material and intent. The class will consist of technical demonstrations in various materials, lectures, critiques, and discussions. Students will learn creative skills in the design process: site analysis, conceptualization, presentation, and production. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Prerequisites: ARS 256

3 credits

ARS 374 Theory and Practice of Printmaking: Intaglio Processes

Further development of the craft of black-and-white intaglio printing, utilizing various methods including dry point, engraving, etching, soft ground, and aquatint, with an emphasis on the history of printmaking. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Prerequisite: ARS 274

3 credits

ARS 375 Theory and Practice of Printmaking: Lithography

Demonstrations and hands-on work in the basic techniques of direct lithographic printing from limestone, primarily in black and white, with an emphasis on the history of printmaking.

Prerequisite: ARS 154
Advisory prerequisite: ARS 274
3 credits

ARS 381 Color and Light Photography

An exploration of the creative aspects of color and light relationships with natural and artificial lighting. This course presents digital imaging techniques, critical color output, and use of the lighting studio. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information. Estimated cost of supplies is $300 in addition to the course fee.

Prerequisite: ARS 281
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARS 382 Analog Black and White Photography

A study of analog black and white photography using traditional materials, processes and analog imaging techniques. Use of black and white photographic film formats, and the darkroom. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Prerequisite: ARS 281
SBC: HFA+
3 credits

ARS 390 Topics in Studio Art

Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific descriptions when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes. Not for major credit.

Prerequisite: ARS 154 or ARS 205
DEC: G
SBC: FA+
3 credits

ARS 420 Studio Art Senior Seminar

An advanced seminar and critique course for seniors to develop a body of work in their individual area, particularly designed for students who wish to continue study and/or work in the visual arts. Where applicable, includes field trips and assignments of special lectures, panels, seminars, and other events and practices of the professional art world. A group exhibition in a public on-campus venue will be strongly encouraged.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing; ARS major or minor

3 credits

ARS 425 Advanced New Media Art

Advanced study of the practice and theory of new media art through production, lecture, discussion, exhibition and critique. Students create self-defined projects that revolve around new media methodologies and techniques. Artwork created in class can include but is not limited to 2 and 3D digital print, video, animation, interactive objects, data, installation and performance. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information. May be repeated once.

Prerequisite: 2 or more of the following courses: ARS 324, ARS 325, ARS 326, ARS 327; ARS 328; ARS 381; ARS 382; ARS 329; CDT 317; CDT 318; or permission of instructor

3 credits

ARS 452 Advanced Theory and Practice of Painting

Examination of ideas and techniques of painting through studio, lecture, critique, exhibition, and painting assignments. May be repeated once.

Prerequisite: ARS 351 and 352; ARH 342

3 credits

ARS 465 Advanced Theory and Practice of Sculpture: Welding, Construction, and Inter-media

An advanced course in the theory, techniques, and methodology’s informed by contemporary studio practice and innovation. The class will consist of technical demonstrations, lectures, critiques and discussions. Emphasis is on creative content, and process, critical thinking, and experimentation. Increased ability in the articulation of three-dimensional form and space will be explored. May be repeated once, for a total of 6 credits.

Prerequisites: ARS 365

3 credits

ARS 466 Advanced Theory and Practice of Sculpture: Installation, Site Specific and Public Art

An advanced investigation of the history, contemporary practice, and techniques of sculpture, installation, and expansions of art in the public realm. Students will explore ideas as research through readings, discussions, and critiques. Emphasis is on the conceptual investigation, and artistic expression through experimentation and production in space/time inquiry. Examinations of ideas through alternative visual processes may be explored. May be repeated once, for a total of 6 credits. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Prerequisite: ARS 365 or ARS 366

3 credits

ARS 471 Advanced Theory and Practice of Printmaking: Intaglio Processes

Continued development of intaglio techniques, emphasizing a variety of multi-plate and single-plate color printing processes, and tailored to the individual requirements of advanced students. May be repeated once.

Prerequisite: ARS 374

3 credits

ARS 472 Advanced Theory and Practice of Printmaking: Lithography

Continued development of lithographic techniques, emphasizing methods of stone and plate lithography and leading to the production of printed single- and multi-colored editions. May be repeated once.

Prerequisite: ARS 375

3 credits

ARS 475 Undergraduate Teaching Practicum I

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member’s regularly scheduled classes. The student is required to attend all the classes, do all the regularly assigned work, and meet with the faculty member at regularly scheduled times to discuss the intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course.

Prerequisites: Studio art major; preferably U4 standing; sponsorship of an instructor; permission of department
SBC: EXP+
3 credits, S/U grading.

ARS 476 Undergraduate Teaching Practicum II

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member’s regularly scheduled classes. The student is required to attend all the classes, do all the regularly assigned work, and meet with the faculty member at regularly scheduled times to discuss the intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course. Students assume greater responsibility in such areas as assisting in demonstrations and critiques, only under direct supervision of the instructor. The course in which the student is permitted to work as a teaching assistant must be different from the course in which he or she previously served.

Prerequisite: ARS 475; permission of department
SBC: EXP+
3 credits, S/U grading.

ARS 481 Advanced Photography

Advanced photography production and independent self-directed project based work, contextualized by readings, discussions, critiques and presentations. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information. Estimated cost of supplies is $300 in addition to the course fee.

Prerequisites: 2 or more of the following courses: ARS 324, ARS 325, ARS 326, ARS 327; ARS 328; ARS 381; ARS 382; ARS 329; CDT 317; CDT 318; or permission of instructor

3 credits

ARS 482 Photography IV

Advanced photography, stressing the theory and practice of communicative skills and presentation, aimed at enabling the serious photography student to follow and develop his or her personal objectives. Emphasis will be on the preparation of a portfolio to reflect each student’s future goals. Estimated cost of supplies is $300 in addition to the Lab fee. May be repeated once, for a total of 6 credits.

Prerequisites: ARS 481 and permission of the instructor after interview and review of portfolio

3 credits

ARS 487 Advanced Directed Projects in Studio Theory and Practice

Advanced independent projects for outstanding students under the supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated once for a maximum of six credits.

Prerequisites: Advanced status in one of the studio areas; sponsorship of a faculty member; permission of department

0 – 6 credits

ARS 488 Internship

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; 15 credits in art department courses; permission of department
SBC: EXP+
0 – 6 credits, S/U grading.

ARS 491 Special Topics in Studio Theory and Practice

May be repeated as the topic changes. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Prerequisite: Permission of department

3 credits

ARS 492 Special Topics in Studio Theory and Practice

May be repeated as the topic changes. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Prerequisite: Permission of department

3 credits

ARS 495 Senior Honors Project in Studio Art

A one-semester project for studio art majors who are candidates for the degree with departmental honors.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and department

3 credits
 

Courses by Consortium for Digital Arts Culture and Technology

CDT 208 Introduction to Digital Media Technology

A survey and hands-on introduction to digital media. Students are introduced to the practical, conceptual, and historical use of computers and related imaging tools in the visual arts through lecture, labs, readings, and project critiques. This course serves as preparation for further study in electronic media and as an opportunity for students in the arts to gain basic computer literacy. Students will develop strategies for combining images and text. Students will then distribute these works on the web. Emphasis is on the conceptual and artistic potential of the technology. No prior computer experience is required. Formerly offered as ARS/THR 208. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Pre- or Corequisite: One ARS, CCS, CSE, ISE, MUS, or THR course
SBC: ARTS, TECH
3 credits

CDT 317 Interactive Media, Performance, and Installation

An investigation of the relationship between music and film and video. Students script, shoot, edit, and create short videos with soundtracks, exploring different aspects of visuals and music. All editing is done digitally. Works may be made for screen, installation, or performance. Also examines historical and contemporary artistic exploration with such media. Formerly offered as ARS/THR 317. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Prerequisite: One ARS, CCS, CSE, ISE, MUS, or THR course
Advisory Prerequisite: ARS/MUS/THR 208 or ARS 225
3 credits

CDT 318 Movie Making: Shoot, Edit, Score

An investigation of the relationship between music and film and video. Students script, shoot, edit, and create short videos with soundtracks, exploring different aspects of visuals and music. All editing is done digitally. Works may be made for screen, installation, or performance. Also examines historical and contemporary artistic exploration with such media. Formerly offered as ARS/THR 318. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Prerequisites: ARS/MUS/THR/CDT 208 or ARS 225 or CCS 101

3 credits

CDT 341 Sound Design

An investigation into the scientific, formal and artistic qualities of sound developed for students who may or may not have had formal musical training. Students will write reviews of sound pieces, create film or game soundtracks, and create sound-based art-works in response to course content, and write a paper on acoustic or psycho-acoustic phenomena. Emphasis is on studio production techniques, history of sound art and basic acoustics. Students will work on Apple computers in the SINC site and LTA. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information.

Prerequisites: One ARS, CCS, CSE, ISE, MUS, or THR course
Advisory Prerequisite: CDT 208 or ARS 225
SBC: ARTS, TECH
3 credits

 

ART HISTORY & CRITICISM GRADUATE COURSES

ARH 501 Theory and Criticism: From Antiquity through the Renaissance

An examination of theoretical treatises and other writings on art from Antiquity through the Renaissance. The influence of theory on practice, and vice versa, is explored through close examination of selected monuments. Changing concepts of the artist’s place in society are also studied as reflected in contemporary critical and expository writing.

Fall or Spring, alternate years.

ARH 502 History of 19th-Century Art Criticism and Theory

A study of European art criticism and theory of the 19th century stressing relationships between art and the history of ideas. Readings concentrate on primary sources, including reviews of art exhibitions (Diderot, Stendhal, Zola), artists’ letters (Constable, Delacroix, the Impressionists), and treatises relating to art (Winckelmann, Proudhon, Ruskin). Special emphasis is given to Baudelaire. Comparisons are made between ways of seeing art as well as between critical and theoretical attitudes to artists’ intentions.

ARH 503 History of 20th-Century Art Criticism and Theory

The literature of art has expanded enormously in the 20th century-far beyond attempts to organize it developmentally or conceptually. An attempt is made to define types of criticism both in relation to the critics and their relation to the support system for the arts of which they are part.

ARH 540 Methodologies of Art History

This graduate seminar is designed to engage students with the history and methods of the discipline of art history. Through close readings and focused discussions, the course examines issues raised by

aesthetics, the problems of biography and ‘periodization’, and the role of canon formation. Particular focus is directed towards the interpretive tools that have developed from within the discipline of art history itself: iconography, formalism, and the social history of art. In addition, also stressed is the interdisciplinary nature of art history through readings that discuss how lines of thought and critical inquiry emerging within other disciplines have had enormous influence on art history and criticism in the last two decades: semiotics, feminist theory, psychoanalysis, anthropology and post colonial theory, cultural studies, theories of mass culture and the post-modern, and the current debates about visual culture.

ARH 541 Topics in Ancient Art

This course deals with a variety of topics relating to ancient art and its influence on later European art and artistic theory. Areas explored include ancient art history, aesthetics, and comparative criticism; Roman uses of Greek art; pagan imagery in early Christian and medieval art; antique art and the Renaissance (use of prototypes); collecting antiquities (from the Medici to Getty); archaeological exploration and publication in the 18th and 19th centuries; French neoclassicism; and the calligraphy of Greek vases (Hamilton, Blake, Flaxman, Ingres, Picasso).

Fall or Spring, alternate years,

ARH 543 Topics in Renaissance Art

This course, usually a seminar, deals with one or several of the following aspects of Renaissance art: iconographic problems, style and connoisseurship (including the study of individual works at the Metropolitan Museum or the Frick), patronage and its effect on the form and content of a work, the exchange of artistic ideas between northern and southern Europe, and Renaissance sources in antiquity and the Middle Ages.

Fall or Spring, alternate years,

ARH 544 Topics in Early Modern Art

This seminar examines methodological developments and historical issues related to the art and visual culture of the early modern period. Though we are concerned with objects, discourses, and practices emerging in the seventeenth century, we also approach these through the perspective of contemporary crtitical tools (for example, theories of urban space, spectacle, and representation; psychoanalysis, sexuality and subjectivity; coloniality and the encounter with New World otherness; semiotics and the construction of absolutist power). Students are encouraged to engage with these issues through the study of traditional high art objects as well as through other forms of representation emerging in the early modern period– for example, scientific illustration, more ephemeral forms of print culture, and even urban and courtly spectacle.

Fall or Spring, alternate years,

ARH 545 Topics in 19th-Century Art

Selected topics in 19th-century art with an emphasis on interdisciplinary approaches to interpretation. Possible topics include politics and art during the French Revolution; English landscape painting and the theory of the picturesque; and French realism and mid-19th-century social thought.

Fall or Spring, alternate years,

ARH 546 Topics in 20th-Century Art

Twentieth-century art considered as an international movement, European and American, although national groups may be studied. Emphasis varies with topics ranging over stylistic analysis, iconographical interpretations, and theoretical studies. Students are expected to undertake original research and interpretation.

Fall or Spring, alternate years,

ARH 547 Topics in Global, Colonial, and Diasporic Art

This course examines various issues in the appreciation, interpretation and appropriation of non-Western art. Emphasis is on developing a critical approach to these arts and the manner in which they have been represented and misrepresented in the Western imagination. Topics vary, but may include exploration of themes in the so-called traditional arts of Africa, Oceania, Native and Latin America, the transformations of these arts during the colonial period, issues of identity and the consequences of dislocation versus sense of place in the diaspora, and contemporary expressions of non-Western artists on the global scene.

Fall or Spring, alternate years,

ARH 549 Topics in American Visual Culture

This course examines selected issues in the history of American art and material culture. The course focuses upon, but is not necessarily limited to, the United States. Topics include public art and public culture; approaches to the study of material culture; art and commercial and/or popular culture; art and regional locations; realism; imaging the West; cross-cultural exchanges in art of the United States.

(May be used to fulfill 20th-century requirement when material deals with 20th-century art.)

ARH 550 Inquiries into Art Criticism and Theory

This course deals with the theoretical approaches to the study of art that cross historical boundaries. Topics vary from semester to semester. They may be an expansion of one of the areas generally covered in ARH 540, such as psychology of art or the iconography of architecture. Other investigations may focus on subjects requiring a special methodological approach, such as the theory and history of ornament and design or the role of public art.

ARH 551 Topics in Performance

The history and theories of performance are explored. Topics may be the performing body, performance and political action, avant-garde performance, performing and artifact, virtual performance, performance and identity. Depending on the topic, there may be a performance component and/or computer based projects.

Fall or spring, alternate years.

ARH 552 Topics in Contemporary Art

The course will examine the latest developments in visual art and architecture, beginning with the Neo-Expressionism and Neo-Conceptualism of the 1980s and extending to installation and video art. Postmodernist and activist art will be examined in particular detail, and contextualized in terms of the broader patterns of 20th century art.

ARH 553 Contemporary Art in New York

A systematic survey of contemporary art on view in museums and galleries in New York. The class would alternate between gallery/museum visits and interpretive analyses of the work in the classroom. A variety of theoretical approaches will be used and the full range of contemporay pluralism will be examined. Contemporary art will be understood as both a manifestation of contemporary society and in terms of its larger art historical context and significance. The New York art scene is the richest in the world. The class offers the student the opportunity for direct, informed contact with it.

Fall or spring, alternate years,

ARH 554 Topics in Visual Culture

This class examines issues in the interdisciplinary field of visual culture. Visual culture studies look at the dynamic state of visual media in contemporary life and their historical origins, seeking to relate art and film to the mass media and digital culture.

ARH 570 Issues in Architectural History and Criticism

This course examines a series of topics that link architecture with other critical disciplines. Among the topics that may be addressed are architectural theory and the theories of language; the history of proportion and the construction of gender; and Orientalism.

ARH 580 Art Criticism or Gallery Internship

An internship offering practical experience in some aspect of the field of art history and criticism, such as gallery and curatorial work in an on-campus or off-campus gallery or museum, or journalistic experience with an art or criticism publication such as the Art department journal Art Criticism.

Prerequisite: Good standing in the graduate art history and criticism program

Fall and Spring, 1 – 3 credits, S/U grading
May be repeated for credit up to six credits.

ARH 591 Practicum in the Writing of Art Criticism

This course is designed as a practicum in the writing of art criticism under the supervision of the faculty.

Fall and Spring,3 credits, S/U grading
May be repeated for credit up to six credits.

ARH 592 Practicum in Teaching

Instruction in the department under the supervision of the faculty. (This course may not be included more than once in the courses taken in fulfillment of the 36 credit hour requirement.)

Fall and Spring, 3 credits, S/U grading

ARH 595 Directed Readings in Art History, Criticism, and Theory

An independent reading course to be arranged with a particular faculty member. Normally, this course is reserved for second year Masters students who have fulfilled most of their course requirements and for whom the proposed program of study cannot be completed within other existing course structures.

ARH 598 Thesis

Prerequisite: Completion of all degree requirements Fall, Spring and Summer, 1 – 6 credits, S/U grading
May be repeated for credit up to six credits.

ARH 602 Teaching Practicum, Advanced

Instruction in the department by advanced graduate students under the supervision of faculty.

3 credits, S/U grading
May be repeated for credit up to six credits.

ARH 690 Directed Readings for Doctoral Candidates

An independent reading course to be arranged with a particular faculty member. Normally, this course is reserved for advanced Ph.D. students who have fulfilled most of their course requirements and for whom the proposed program of study cannot be completed within other existing course structures.

Fall and Spring, 1-3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)
May be repeated for credit.

ARH 699 Dissertation Research on Campus

Prerequisite: Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research must take place on SBU campus, at Cold Spring Harbor, or at the Brookhaven National Lab.

Fall, Spring, and Summer, 1 – 12 credits, S/U grading
May be repeated for credit.

ARH 700 Dissertation Research off Campus – Domestic

Prerequisite: Must be advanced to candidacy (G5).

Major portion of research will take place off-campus, but in the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Please note, Brookhaven National Labs and the Cold Spring Harbor Lab are considered on-campus. All international students must enroll in one of the graduate student insurance plans and should be advised by an International Advisor.

Fall, Spring, Summer, 1 – 9 credits, S/U grading
May be repeated for credit.

ARH 701 Dissertation Research off Campus – International

Prerequisite: Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place outside of the United States and/or U.S. provinces.

Domestic students have the option of the health plan and may also enroll in MEDEX.

International students who are in their home country are not covered by mandatory health plan and must contact the Insurance Office for the insurance charge to be removed. International students who are not in their home country are charged for the mandatory health insurance. If they are to be covered by another insurance plan they must file a waiver be second week of classes. The charge will only be removed if other plan is deemed comparable.

All international students must received clearance from an International Advisor.

Fall, Spring, Summer, 1 – 9 credits, S/U grading
May be repeated for credit.

ARH 800 Summer Research

 

STUDIO ART GRADUATE COURSES

ARS 520 Special Projects for M.F.A. Candidates

Advanced projects in areas that may not be included in the M.F.A. curriculum, utilizing the unique talents of regular and visiting faculty, the facilities of the Art department, or other aspects of the university environment, and possibly facilities at other locations or institutions. Prerequisites: Faculty sponsor, permission of graduate studies director.

Fall, Spring and Summer,

ARS 525 Digital Arts

An exploration of the experimental artistic practices utilizing computer and electronic technologies: digital imaging, video and audio, web and DVD production, and interactive installation. It will provide practical instruction in the use of computer media with an orientation towards relating this to the graduate student’s own practice. It will also analyze the unique possibilities of this hybrid and developing art form through theoretical readings and examination of recent works, exhibitions, festivals, and the worldwide web.

Prerequisite: Accepted candidate for M.F.A. or permission of department

ARS 530 Professional Experience Internship

Internship in the professional art world of New York City and its environs. Depending on the career objectives of the M.F.A. candidate, the student may choose to intern at a foundry, printmaking atelier, art gallery or museum, known artist’s studio, or related facility or institution.

Prerequisite: Accepted candidate for M.F.A.

Fall, Spring and Summer, 1 – 3 credits, S/U grading
May be repeated 1 times for credit.

ARS 531 Graduate Teaching Practicum

Supervised teaching practicum in undergraduate studio or studio, theory course.

Prerequisite: Accepted candidate for M.F.A.
May be repeated for credit up to six credits.

ARS 532 Thesis Project

Preparation of thesis under the program advisor.

Prerequisites: Accepted candidate for M.F.A., review board passed

Fall, Spring and Summer, 1 – 6 credits, S/U grading

ARS 535 Projects in Studio Art

Projects in Studio art, field and media to be determined on a per semester basis by the individual instructor.

ARS 540 Graduate Photo Studio

Photographic studio, theory, and laboratory emphasizing individual development as a photographer. Color and black-and-white studios and darkrooms. Fine arts, reportage, illustration, commercial, and industrial.

Prerequisites: Demonstration of appropriate level of proficiency, permission of instructor

ARS 550 In-Process Critique

Graduate theory and practice of art, investigating historical and contemporary concepts, concentrating on individual development as an artist. The course provides students with vigorous critical feedback, augmented with readings and discussions of related New York City exhibitions in galleries and museums to inform the development of their work. Required for first year M.F.A. students for whom this course culminates in a body of work for the end of the spring semester First Year Exhibition.

Prerequisite: Accepted candidate for M.F.A. or permission of department

ARS 551 Graduate Painting Studio

Studio and theory in painting and related visual forms, with instruction and facilities available in all media and techniques; emphasis on individual development as an artist. Models and space for environmental and conceptual works available.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; accepted candidate for M.F.A. or permission of department

ARS 560 Graduate Sculpture Studio

Theory and practice of sculpture for the graduate student, with instruction and facilities available in all media and techniques; emphasis on individual development as an artist. Studio facilities include air, electric, and hydraulic power equipment; TIG, MIG, Arc, and flame welding; forging; woodworking; modeling, molding, and casting facilities for clay, wax, plaster, and plastics; and metal casting capabilities in investment, shell, sand, and centrifugal.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; accepted candidate for M.F.A. or permission of department

ARS 561 Graduate Ceramics and/ or Ceramic Sculpture Studio

Theory and practice of ceramics and ceramic sculpture for the graduate student with emphasis on individual development as an artist. Advanced studio instruction in handbuilding: coil, slab, pinch; wheelthrowing; casting, inclusive of multipiece plaster pour-molds; various firing techniques: reduction, oxidation, raku, and high- and low-fire glaze techniques.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; accepted candidate for M.F.A. or permission of department

ARS 570 Graduate Printmaking Studio

Graduate studio in the theory and practice of printmaking. Color, black-and-white, and photographic processes in plate and stone lithography, serigraphy, relief, and intaglio, emphasizing the student’s individual development as an artist.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; accepted candidate for M.F.A. or permission of department

ARS 580 Visual Arts Seminar

Required seminar and critique throughout the M.F.A. curriculum. Guest speakers, artists, and critics; demonstrations and lectures; seminars; individual and group critiques. The M.F.A. candidate, as part of this seminar, regularly participates in critiques in which his or her work is analyzed by guest faculty and art history/criticism faculty and graduate students, as well as by his or her peers. The visual arts seminar, where applicable, includes field trips and assignments of special lectures, panels, seminars, and other events of the professional art world.

ARS 800 Summer Research