Luminescence 2017

Hunter’s Point, Long Island City, New York

Commissioned by the New York City Economic Development Corporation

6 feet diameter dome shaped mound

Portland cement with integrated phosphorus particles and pigment and reflective silicon carbide grains.

Designed to enhance a new public waterfront park situated on approximately 30 acres of prime East River property in Long Island City,  “Luminescence” consists of seven sculptures that emulate the seven phases of the moon. Each moon sculpture is cast in white Portland cement in a 6-foot diameter domed mold. The moon mold is milled using NASA topographic survey data collected by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), to form a stylized but accurate representation of the moon’s surface, a pattern of craters, mountains, and valleys. The moon’s phases are represented with integrated phosphorus particles and pigment and reflective silicon carbide grains.

The phosphor in the moon’s surface absorbs sunlight during the day. As dusk approaches, the phase of each of the moons is revealed by bright pale blue points of light blended into a glowing soft blue background.

For many early civilizations, and to this day, the phases of the moon are a measurement of time. An ancient custom still remaining in the Japanese lunar calendar is a day to observe the moon. We also all know that the moon is responsible for the ocean tides. My goal was to create a work that connects with the site and metaphorically and poetically narrates the seven days, and the monthly tidal rhythm of the East River at Hunter’s Point South Water Park.

Luminesce is a sculpture depicting seven phases of the moon. At night each phase is illuminated by a phosphorescent polymer integrated into the moon’s surface; each phase absorbing sunlight during the day and emitting light at night. The placement on the peninsula lawn would make a natural overlook where people will use the large moon surfaces as a place to sit, when as dusk approaches and all throughout the night, a blue light will glow from each sculpture, illuminating seven phases of the moon.

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