Candice Breitz, From A to B and Back Again

Monday, November 10, 7:00pm
Candice Breitz, From A to B and Back Again

Candice Breitz is a Berlin-based artist whose moving image installations have been shown internationally. She has been a tenured Professor at the Hochschule für Bildende Künste in Braunschweig since 2007. Breitz has spent long stretches of time producing works in Jamaica, Italy, Germany, Austria, Japan, Sweden, Great Britain, Ukraine, South Africa, the United States, India, and Nigeria. Her immersive practice seeks to capture and observe the nuanced ways in which individuals relate to and are determined by the dense social constellations in which they exist. She will talk about and screen footage from several works that she has made on the road over the last decade, discussing the ways in which her creative practice has been shaped by the myriad of people and places that each work must negotiate as it comes into being.

Admission:
Free and open to the public

Date:
Monday, 7:00 p.m. November 10, 2014

Place:
Stony Brook Manhattan
101 East 27th Street, 3rd Floor,
New York, NY 10016

Direction:
Please visit this link: SBU Manhattan / directions

(Image Credit: Candice Breitz, Factum Kang, 2009, Dual-Channel Installation: 2 Hard Drives / Duration: 69 minutes, 10 seconds. Commissioned by The Power Plant, Toronto.)

Archive Link -> http://art.stonybrook.edu/lecture-series/

 

.

Between the Black Box and the White Cube: Expanded Cinema and Postwar Art

Andrew V. Uroskie, Associate Professor and Director of the MA/PhD in Art History, Criticism and Theory, at the book release party for “Between the Black Box and the White Cube: Expanded Cinema and Postwar Art” (University of Chicago Press, 2014) at the College Art Association Annual Conference in Chicago. Art Libraries Review

Update 05/08/2015:
Review of “Between the Black Box and the White Cube” for the College Art Association’s “Critical Reviews”: http://www.caareviews.org/reviews/2407

.
.
.
.

In “Five Star”, Keith Miller’s Leading Man Is a General in the East New York Bloods

Keith Miller’s latest film grew out of his 2011 short, “Gang Bangin’ 101.” In that two-minute doc, James “Primo” Grant – a burly, bearded Brooklyn native who works as a bouncer at a Bed-Stuy nightclub – spoke frankly about joining the East New York Bloods when he was 12 and eventually becoming a five-star general in what he calls the “brotherhood.”
(excerpt from bedfordandbowery.com)
More info: LINK

This film is also an official selection of the Tribeca Film Festival 2014.

Keith Miller, SBU Art 2001 M.F.A.

Assistant Professor, Zabet Patterson has won the prestigious 2012 Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant for New Book

Zabet Patterson, Assistant Professor of Art History & Criticism, and Assistant Professor in the Consortium for Digital Art, Culture and Technology, has won the prestigious 2012 Warhol Foundation | Creative Capital Arts Writers Grant for her new book project.

Visionary Machines: USCO, Techno-Utopia and Technocracy will be the first book to provide a historical and theoretical account of USCO, a group of poets, filmmakers, artists, and engineers who lived and worked as an artists’ collective from 1963 to 1966. USCO participated in a counterculture that straddled the Beats and the Hippies and intersected with figures from Silicon Valley, academia, and the art world, including Marshall McLuhan, Timothy Leary, Andy Warhol, Allen Ginsberg, Carolee Schneeman, John Cage, and Robert Rauschenberg. Widely influential during the 1960s, USCO was essentially lost to history because their work doesn’t fit into many of the traditional cultural and artistic narratives of the period. Nevertheless, USCO’s story offers a unique insight into the problems and possibilities of advanced computational technology, at a point when the world was shifting from the mechanical to the cybernetic age. Patterson will argue that USCO interrogated information technology without slipping into either melancholic fatalism or uncritical techno-utopianism. Instead, they created fictional worlds that fused scientific innovation with mystical exploration, while grappling with the rough work of building community.Zabet Patterson is assistant professor in the Department of Art at Stony Brook University, where she specializes in the intersection of contemporary art and computational media in the postwar period. Her recent articles include “Cybernetic Cinema: From the Gun Controller to the Mandala” in Grey Room and “POEMFIELDs and the Materiality of the Computational Screen” in Animation. She has presented on modern and contemporary art and computational media at symposia in Istanbul, London, Florence, Vancouver, Tokyo, and the United States, and has curated exhibitions on sound art and locative media. She received her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley in 2007.
http://artswriters.org/index.php?action=grantee_detail&grantee_id=153&year=2012

Humanities Institute Event


Adam Lowenstein, Spaces of Violence: History, Horror, and the Cinema of Kiyoshi Kurosawa.

Tuesday, November 20, 2012, 4:30 p.m., Humanities 1008
This event is co-sponsored by the Charles B. Wang Center.