UNDERGRADUATE Programs

HISTORY AND CRITICISM REQUIREMENTS | STUDIO ART REQUIREMENTS | HONORS | HISTORY MINOR | STUDIO MINOR | DIGITAL ARTS MINOR | TABLER CENTER

Director of Undergraduate Studies:
Barbara E. Frank (barbara.frank@stonybrook.edu)
Room 2226 – 631.632.1171
Digital Arts Minor:
Stephanie Dinkins (stephanie.dinkins@stonybrook.edu)
Room 4246 – please email

Application Information

The Art Department offers two majors, one in art history and criticism, and one in studio art. It also offers a minor in Digital Arts.

The undergraduate programs in art are designed to provide the student with a thorough background in the history and criticism of art, as well as sound training in studio techniques and theory. The courses of study, while allowing students a considerable degree of choice, will also usually fulfill requirements for admission to graduate study or preparation for professional work in the field.

Art history and criticism majors acquire a thorough foundation in the history of Western art and architecture, from ancient to modern, with tracks also in non-Western art, and such practical aspects of the discipline as gallery management.

Studio art majors concentrate on the creative, technical, and practical aspects of the discipline, acquiring a broad-based background in drawing, design, painting, and sculpture, plus specialized tracks in ceramics, printmaking, photography, and digital and electronic media. In addition majors areexpected to acquire a sound foundation in art history and criticism with the emphasis on modernism.

Art Department graduates who go on to work in the discipline usually acquire some post-graduate training, which may include anything from a few additional courses to such advanced graduate degrees as the M.A., M.F.A., or Ph.D. University at Stony Brook studio art graduates hold teaching positions up to and including the college level; others work as commercial artists, master printers, photographers and designers. Art history/criticism graduates hold teaching positions in colleges and universities; others work as gallery or museum administrators, or as art critics.

 

Requirements for the Major in Art History and Criticism (ARH)

The major in art history and criticism leads to the Bachelor of Arts degree. All courses offered for the major must be passed with a letter grade of C or higher.

Completion of the major requires 39 credits.

1. Two introductory art history courses:

  • ARH 101 Art in Culture from Prehistoric Times to the Age of the
    Cathedrals, ca. 1400 A.D.
  • ARH 102 Art in Culture from the Early Renaissance, ca. 1400, to
    Postmodernism

2. One or two 400-level seminar courses.

3. Courses in art history and criticism (21-24 credits) distributed to include at least one course in four of the following areas:

a. Ancient and Medieval art and architecture:
ARH 300, 301, 302, 305, 325

b. Renaissance (14th-16th c), and Early Modern (17th-18th c) art and architecture:
ARH 306, 307, 310, 314, 315, 316, 320, 337, 390

c. Modern (19th -20th c) art and architecture:
ARH 205, 322, 324, 330, 331, 332, 333, 342, 346, 347

d. Asian, Middle Eastern, African, Oceanic, Native American, Mesoamerican art and architecture:
ARH 201, 203, 317, 318, 326, 328, 329

e. Contemporary Art and Photography, Performance, Visual Culture:
CCS 101, ARH 334, 335, 336, 344, 345, 365, 404

f. Advanced Independent Study:
ARH 487, 495

4. One of the following (6 credits)

a. ARS 154, plus one additional ARS course.

b. Foreign language (especially for students planning graduate work in art history), a year of French or German at the intermediate level or higher, (201, 212) or another language, after consultation with the Undergraduate Director.

5. Upper-Division Writing Requirement
Students must demonstrate acceptable writing skills before they graduate. Before the end of the second semester of his or her junior year, each student majoring in art history and criticism must submit to the director of undergraduate studies three term papers for art history courses together with each instructor’s satisfactory evaluation, confirming that the paper demonstrates advanced writing proficiency suitable for art history majors. At least two of the papers must have been written for upper-division courses and for different instructors. The student must notify the instructor before each paper is turned in that it is intended to satisfy this requirement in addition to the course requirements. A student anticipating or experiencing difficulty in satisfying this requirement should seek the advice of the director of undergraduate studies as soon as possible.

 

Requirements for the Major in Studio Art (ARS)

The major in studio art leads to the Bachelor of Arts degree. All courses offered for the major must be passed with a letter grade of C or higher.

Completion of the major requires 57 credits.

1. Two introductory art history courses:

  • ARH 101 Art in Culture from Prehistoric Times to the Age of the Cathedrals, ca. 1400 A.D.
  • ARH 102 Art in Culture from the Early Renaissance, ca. 1400, to Postmodernism

2. ARS 154 Foundations of Drawing

3. ARS 225 Introductory Digital Art or CDT 208 Introduction to Digital Media Technology

4. At least six additional credits in art history/criticism, of which at least three must be in modern (i.e., one course from ARH 322, 324, 330, 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 336, 342, 344, 345)

5. Thirty-six additional credits in studio art. Twelve of the required studio credits must be in upper-division courses and twelve must be in one of the following areas of concentration:

a. Painting, Drawing, and Printmaking: ARS 255, 274, 350, 351, 352, 359, 374, 375, 452, 471, 472

b. Digital Arts and Photography: ARS 225, 281, 325, 326, 327, 328, 381, 425, 481, 482, CDT 208, 317, 318, 341

c. Sculpture and Ceramic Sculpture: ARS 256, 264, 364, 365, 366, 465, 466

d. Additional Advanced Study: ARS 475, 476, 487, 488, 491, 492, 495

7. Students must demonstrate acceptable writing skills before they graduate. Before the end of the second semester of his or her junior year, each student majoring in Studio Art must submit to the director of undergraduate studies three term papers (minimum of 5 pages) together with each instructor’s satisfactory evaluation, confirming that the paper demonstrates advanced writing proficiency suitable for studio art majors. At least two papers must be from ARH upper-division courses and from different instructors. The third paper can be from ARS or a lower division course. The student must notify the instructor before each paper is turned in that it is intended to satisfy this requirement in addition to the course requirements. A student anticipating or experiencing difficulty in satisfying this requirement should seek the advice of the director of undergraduate studies as soon as possible.

 

Honors Program in Art

The honors program is open to seniors majoring in art history/criticism or studio art who have maintained a grade point average of at least 3.00 overall and 3.50 in the major. The student should apply for the honors program before the beginning of the senior year. The student must find a faculty member of the department to act as sponsor. The student, with the approval of the sponsor, must submit a proposal of a project, in writing,to the department. Acceptance into the honors program depends on the approval of the proposal by the department. Selected students for the program must enroll in ARH or ARS 495 for the semester in which they pursue their project.

In the art history/criticism field, the student’s research project is supervised by the honors advisor. In the studio art field, the student is expected to prepare a small one-person show or similar project (i.e., one large, more ambitious work) in lieu of a thesis, under the supervision of the honors advisor.

The student’s project is judged by a jury composed of at least two members of the Art Department and a faculty member from another department. This pertains to students in both the art history/criticism and studio art majors. If the honors program is completed with distinction, and the student achieves a 3.50 grade point average in all art courses taken in the senior year, honors are conferred.

 

Minor in Art History

With the minor in art history, the student acquires both a broad background in art history and a more thorough knowledge of the art history in one or more of the following areas: ancient, medieval, Asian/African/Oceanic/Native American/ Mesoamerican, Renaissance, Baroque, or Modern.

Requirements for the Minor in Art History (ARH)
All courses offered for the minor must be passed with a letter grade of C or higher.

Completion of the minor requires 21 credits in art history, of which at least nine credits must be in upper-division courses.

1. Two introductory Art History courses:

  • ARH 101 Art in Culture from Prehistoric Times to the Age of the Cathedrals, ca. 1400 A.D.
  • ARH 102 Art in Culture from the Early Renaissance, ca. 1400, to Postmodernism

2. An ancient, medieval, Middle Eastern, Asian, African, Oceanic, Native American, or Mesoamerican art course

3. A renaissance, baroque, or modern art course

4. Nine additional credits in art history

 

Minor in Studio Art

Requirements for the Minor in Studio Art (ARS)
All courses offered for the minor must be passed with a letter grade of C or higher.

Completion of the minor in studio art requires 21 credits.

1. ARS 154 Foundations of Drawing

2. Eighteen additional studio credits, of which at least nine must be upper division

 

Minor in Digital Arts

Program Advisers:
Christa Erickson
(christa.erickson@stonybrook.edu)
Stephanie Dinkins (stephanie.dinkins@stonybrook.edu)

Digital technologies are reshaping all aspects of our culture; the arts and its related commercial and entertainment industries are no exception. The Digital Arts Minor enables students to explore digital production tools in print, web, video, animation, game, CD, DVD, performance, installation, interactive experience, information visualization, and public space. In addition to production skills, the Digital Arts Minor builds critical literacy in reading and understanding images, sound, and information as well as in interacting in mediated social networks. It encourages creative thinking and problem solving, often cited as necessary skills for the 21st century and the pace of change in technology. The minor provides the education and fosters skills now crucial to being a citizen, consumer, cultural producer, and innovator in today’s global visual and information culture.

This minor is particularly well suited for, but not limited to, students in Studio Art (ARS), Cinema and Cultural Studies (CCS), Computer Science (CSE), Multidisciplinary Studies (MTD), Music (MUS), Theatre (THR), Journalism (JRN), and Business (BUS).

 

All courses for the minor in Digital Arts must be passed with a grad of “C” or higher. Completion of the minor requires 21 credits. Nine or more credits for the minor must be upper division.

To earn a Digital Arts Minor students must take 1 Core course (category A), 1 Foundations course (category B), and 1 Intermediate Production course (category C). Students must also take 1 additional production course chosen from categories C or D, 1 Theory and Culture course chosen from category E, and 6 additional elective credits chosen from categories C, D or E.

A. Core Courses (pick one):

  • ARS/MUS/THR/CDT 208: Introduction to Digital Media Technology
  • ARS 225: Introductory Digital Art

B. Foundations in the Arts (pick one):

  • DIA/ARH 207: Digital Media: History and Theory
  • ARS 205: Foundations in Visual Arts: Idea and Form
  • CCS 101-B: Images & Texts: Understanding Culture

C. Intermediate Production Courses (pick one):

  • ARS/MUS/THR/CDT 317: Interactive, Performance, Media, and MIDI
  • ARS/MUS/THR/CDT 318: Movies: Shoot, Score, and Edit
  • ARS 324: Intermediate Digital Arts: Design
  • ARS 325: Intermediate Digital Arts: Print
  • ARS 326: Intermediate Digital Arts: Video
  • ARS 327-H: Intermediate Digital Arts: Web Art, Design, and Culture
  • ARS 328 Intermediate Digital Arts: Animation
  • ARS 425: Advanced Digital Arts
  • MUS 340: Introduction to Music Technologies
  • ARS/MUS/THR/CDT 341: Sound Design

D. Other Production Courses:

  • ARS 381: Photography 2
  • ARS 481: Photography 3
  • ARS 482: Photography 4
  • ARS 390-G/491/492: Topics (only approved topics)
  • ARS 487: Advanced Directed Projects in Studio
  • ARS 495: Senior Honors Project in Studio Art
  • ARS/MUS/THR/CCS/CSE/ISE 488: Internship
  • CSE 102: Introduction to Web Design and Programming
  • ISE 108: Introduction to Programming
  • ISE 208: Programming II
  • CSE 325: Computer Science and Sculpture
  • CSE 334: Introduction to Multimedia Systems (also ISE 334)
  • CSE 364: Advanced Multimedia (also ISE 364)
  • CSE 380: Computer Game Programming
  • CSE 381: Advanced Game Programming
  • MUS 344: Audio Engineering
  • MUS 437: Electronic Music

E. Theory and Culture Courses :

  • DIA/CCS 396-H: Video and Computer Game History
  • DIA/CCS 397-H: Video and Computer Game Culture
  • ARH 322-G: American Art Since 1947
  • ARH 333: Arts for the Public
  • ARH 335-G: History of Photography
  • ARH 336-G: Digital Visual Culture
  • ARH 342: Art of the 20th Century
  • ARH 344-G: Performance Art II: World War II to the Present
  • ARH 345-G: The Moving Image in 20th Century Art
  • ARH 400: Topics in Art History
  • CCS 301-G: Theorizing Cinema & Culture
  • CCS 391-K: Topics in Diasporic Cinema and Cultural Studies
  • CCS 313-G: Television Studies
  • CCS 395-G: Topics in Digital Cultural Studies
  • CCS 401: Senior Seminar in Cinema & Cultural Studies
  • CSE 301-H: History of Computing
  • EST 310: Game Design
  • MUS 300-H: Music, Technology, and Digital Culture
  • THR 277: The Media Industry
  • THR 403: Media: Theory and Criticism

Notes:

  • No more than six credits from any 488 internship may be applied to the minor.
  • No more than three credits from 487 may be applied to the minor.
  • Pre-approval for appropriate 487 projects and 488 internships is required.
  • ARS majors should ber aware that many ARS courses require ARS 154 as a prerequisite, although ARS 154 is not required for DIA courses

 

TABLER CENTER FOR ARTS, CULTURE, AND HUMANITIES

The College of Arts , Culture, and Humanities—located in the five residence hall Tabler Quad—will give students the ideal context in which to explore their artistic creativity and cultural curiosity. The new Tabler Center is the jewel in the Tabler Quad crown, a 10,000 square-foot playground for exploration of the arts and humanities. When completed in 2004-05, this state of the art complex will house a 250-seat performance space for theater, dance, and music, a radio and television studio, an art gallery devoted exclusively to undergraduate works, practice rooms and artist’s studios, a digital arts laboratory with the latest arts software, a conference hall and classroom. The Tabler Café will serve food and a private dining room will be available in which classes and clubs can eat and talk, and students can gather to discuss projects, events, or simply relax together.