Campaign for Public Sculpture Conservation


Photo Credit: AMNY/Mark Chiusano

Art History faculty member Michele Bogart is at the forefront of efforts to conserve reliefs by Harlem Renaissance artist Richmond Barthé at Kingsborough houses in Brooklyn, as a recent piece has explored while highlighting the complexity of the issue:

Bogart is a champion of public art who is trying to find a champion for Barthé. NYCHA is facing an urgent capital needs deficit of billions, but maybe money to protect the frieze can be found elsewhere. Alternative funding from the City Council? The borough president’s office? A partnership with something like the Ford Foundation, which has made a cause out of public art and expression? Maybe the money is somewhere to fix what NYCHA couldn’t protect. Bogart points to the city Parks Department which she said does a solid job maintaining and monitoring public art.

Continuing reading online to get the full story.

Apple features Professor Stephanie Dinkins in “Behind the Mac” Campaign

Apple Inc has recently recognized Professor Stephanie Dinkins’ research and community-centered efforts by featuring her as a local hero in their “Behind the Mac” ad campaign.

The New York Times recently featured Dinkins in its pages as an AI influencer: “Five AI Influencers in their Own Words” and was also featured in Wired: “The Case for Giving Robots an Identity.

Additional, Dinkins was recently a guest on Tilted, A Lean in Podcast and on the All Turtles Podcast.

New Work Exhibited from MFA Alum Athena LaTocha

Athena recently had the opportunity to make a new work for the Crystal Bridges Museum’s traveling exhibition “Art for a New Understanding: Native Voices, 1950s to Now, ” on display between October 05, 2018 – January 07, 2019.

For Art for a New Understanding: Native Voices, 1950s to Now, artist Athena LaTocha visited Northwest Arkansas and Pea Ridge National Military Park. The result of this visit is a work specific to the region, both the lush topography of the Ozarks as well as what the land has seen over time.

The entire cultural history of the land impacts LaTocha’s work– in this case, the Trail of Tears and the Civil War. During her visit, certain elements of the Arkansas landscape lingered: burnt trees, the smell of wet earth, sun on the rocks, and the erosion and striation of rock features. LaTocha connected the burnt wood and bluff overhangs with the experience of war and trauma in the land’s past.

Michele H. Bogart to Give Lecture on “Sculpture in Gotham”

Are there any related links you would like included? : usp_custom_field : https://www.green-wood.com/event/sculpture-in-gotham/

Professor Michele H. Bogart will be speaking about her new book Sculpture in Gotham on Wednesday, September 26th at 6:30 at Brooklyn‘s historic Green-Wood Cemetery. Dr. Harry Weil, Ph.D. , M.A., and B.A. in, Art History, Stony Brook University, heads up Green-Wood’s Public Programs. Tickets can be purchased online here.

Stephanie Dinkins wins SOROS Equality Fellowship to develop NTOO

A prestigious Soros fellowship has been awarded to Stephanie Dinkins, associate professor in the College of Arts and Sciences Department of Art. Dinkins was recently named to the Open Society Foundation’s 2018 class of Soros Equality Fellows, a program intended to help incubate innovators and risk-takers striving to create and develop new ways of addressing the challenges of racial disparity and discrimination in the United States.

Through this fellowship, Professor Dinkins is developing Not the Only One (NTOO), a multigenerational memoir of one black American family told from the perspective of an artificial intelligence with an evolving intellect.

An interdisciplinary artist who investigates how artificial intelligence intersects with race, gender, aging, and the future, Professor Dinkins is particularly driven to work with communities of color to develop deep-rooted AI literacy and co-create more culturally inclusive equitable artificial intelligence. Through her NTOO project, she strives to create a new kind of artificially intelligent narrative form that uses oral history and creative storytelling methods, such interactivity, vocalization and verbal ingenuity to spark the imagination and draw more underrepresented communities into crucial conversations about AI and careers that can impact the trajectory of this far-reaching technology.

ArtNet Editors’ Pick: Professor Zabet Patterson on Algorithmic Art in Chelsea

Image: Judith Stenneken, video still from Staircase, 2018

ArtNet Editors’ Pick: Tuesday, July 17, professor Zabet Patterson will moderate a discussion of algorithmic art with Beryl Korot, Manfred Mohr, and Judith Stenneken at Flowers Gallery in Chelsea for the opening of the exhibition “Yes No Maybe.”

Flowers Gallery, 529 West 20th Street

Editors’ Picks: 17 Things Not to Miss in New York’s Art World This Week


http://www.artnet.com/galleries/flowers/yes-no-maybe/

Former MA Student Monica Bravo accepts Assistant Professor position at CCA

Monica Bravo ’09, was recently appointed to a tenure-track position as Assistant Professor of the History and Theory of Photographic Media at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco.

Bravo completed her Masters in Stony Brook’s Graduate Program in Art History & Criticism with a graduate certificate in Art & Philosophy.  She completed her MA thesis under the direction of Andrew Uroskie on the philosophical aesthetics of Chris Marker’s photographic practice. She subsequently completed a doctorate in Art History at Brown, and served as a Lecturer at Yale before joining CCA in 2018. Bravo will be chairing the panel “Making/Writing Artists’ Lives” at the 2019 College Art Association Conference in NYC, to explore contemporary artists whose practice involves the creation of fictional personas.

Assistant Professor Ian Alan Paul’s video essay “The Dis/Appeared” to be featured at WOCMES

Ian Alan Paul’s video essay “The Dis/Appeared: 25 Notes on Colonial Regimes of Perception” will be screened at this summer’s World Congress of Middle Eastern Studies in Sevilla, Spain as part of the conference’s acclaimed Film Festival.

Through narration and a montage of images that are at once ordinary and unsettling, the video essay gives an account of settler-colonial instantiations of power while also proposing a tactical repertoire to be taken up against colonial rule. The project was produced over the course of 2017 while the artist was living and teaching in the West Bank of Palestine, and is the first part of a series of films, installations, and texts that examine the conjuncture of coloniality, governmentality, and memory in global contexts.

Stony Brook Department of Art 2018 Graduate Colloquium

7 May 2018
Department of Art Conference Room (2215)

 

9:30-10:00
Coffee and bagels

 

10:00-10:15
Lisa Strickland: Postwar American female sculptors and environmental art

10:15-10:35
Jasna Boudard: Interactivity: creating shared experiences

10:35-10:50
Sierra Rooney: Monumental Change? Rosa Parks and the United States Capitol Statuary Collection

10:50-11:10
Karine Falleni: Coexistence

11:10-11:25
Nikki Georgopoulos: Make-Up and Mechanical Reproduction: Mary Cassatt’s Prints of 1891

11:25-11:45
Razieh Jafari: Text as Image: Calligraphy in Contemporary Iranian Art

11:45-12:00
Amy Rahn: “This Particular Very Dark Thing”: Joan Mitchell’s Black Paintings

12:00-12:20
Justin Roxo: Untitled

 

12:20
Potluck Lunch

Natalie Bell, Associate Curator at the New Museum @ Stony Brook University Department of Art | Monday, May 7th | South Studios

Natalie Bell is Associate Curator at the New Museum, New York, where she has curated and co-curated recent solo exhibitions by Hiwa K (2018), Anna Boghiguian (2018), Jonathas de Andrade (2017), Elaine Cameron-Weir (2017), Kahlil Joseph (2017), Albert Oehlen (2015), Barbara Rossi (2015), Anri Sala (2016), Andra Ursuta (2016), and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye (2017). She has also co-curated several major group exhibitions at the New Museum, including Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon (2017); The Keeper (2016), and Here and Elsewhere (2014).

Alexandra Zigomalas (Art History Major) featured as URECA Researcher of the Month

Alexandra Zigomalas is a double major in History and Art History with a minor in Writing. Throughout her past four years at Stony Brook, she has worked at the Writing Center, the Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery, and has been a member of the Women’s Leadership Council. Alexandra has written two honors theses for each of her majors. Her art history project is titled, “Paying a Prince: Gian Lorenzo Bernini and The Payment of Sculptors in Seventeenth-Century Rome,”and was advised by Dr. Karen Lloyd in the fall of 2017. Alexandra received funding through the Women’s Leadership Council to study abroad in Rome in order to do research for this project. Her second thesis titled, “‘The Figure Before the Booke’: The Image of the Mystic Massacre in John Underhill’s Newes from America, 1638,” explores the potential meanings behind and purposes of an image in John Underhill’s seventeenth-century narrative of the Pequot War. Dr. Ned Landsman in the history department advised this project, and Alexandra presented it at this year’s URECA symposium. She also presented a paper at the 2017 URECA symposium titled, “ La Danse et Les Dames du Ballet: Edgar Degas and The Representation of Movement through the Belle Époque Ballerina.” Kevin Clouther in the Program in Writing and Rhetoric advised this project. Alexandra is a five-time recipient of the Academic Achievement Award that honors students with a 4.0-semester GPA and a recipient of the Undergraduate Recognition Award for Academic Excellence. She has enjoyed working closely with all of her faculty advisors and mentors, and will miss them this upcoming fall when she will be pursuing her PhD in Art History at Emory University.

https://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/ureca/feature/_bio/2018/May2018.php